Children’s Developmental MilestonesChildren’s Developmental Milestones


Please see the below information to use as a guideline on typical development. It is important to remember that all children develop at different rates, and there is a wide range of “typical development” during these ages.

Please consult your child’s pediatrician if you have concerns, or contact the Early Childhood Coordinator, Melissa Ward, at 847-593-4393 or via email at [email protected]


Children’s developmental milestones

 

Ages 12-18 months

 

Cognitive
• Identifies family members in photographs
• Enjoys cause and effect relationship
• Is able to make choices between clear alternatives
• Begins to solve problems
• Remembers more

Language (Native Language)
• Has expressive vocabulary of 4-10 words (by 13-15 months)
• Has expressive vocabulary of 10-20 words (by 18 months)
• Can listen and respond to simple directions

Social/Emotional

• Prefers to keep caregiver in sight while exploring environment
• Demands personal attention
• May reveal stubbornness
• Unable to share
• Responds to simple requests

Physical
• Picks up small objects with pointer finger and thumb
• Can build a tower of cubes
• Can throw a ball
• Walks well
• Turns pages in a book
• Can walk while holding an object


Ages 18-24 months


Cognitive

• Sorts shapes and colors
• Mimics adult behavior
• Points to and names objects
• Refers to self by name
• Learns by helping
• Learns concepts such as size, shape and weight as he/she moves and plays with objects in the environment

Language (Native Language)
• Has expressive vocabulary of 20-25 words
• Uses 2-word phrases to communicate
• Uses gestures to communicate
• Begins using courtesy words (please, thank you) occasionally

Social/Emotional
• Is possessive
• Begins to show empathy
• Reveals a sense of trust
• Begins to play next to children
• Shows emotions of pride and embarrassment
• May dawdle
• Engages in imaginative play
• Tests limits of behavior
• Performs for an audience

Physical
• Can draw scribbles
• Kicks backward and forward
• Stands on a balance beam
• Walks up stairs with help
• Runs well
• Enjoys riding small-wheeled riding toys
• Drinks from a straw


Ages 2-3 Years

Cognitive
• Comprehends size
• Beginning to understand time sequences (e.g. before lunch)
• Matches shapes and colors
• Counts and manipulates objects
• Is beginning to think about consequences
• Is able to concentrate for longer periods of time

Language (Native)
• Combines words to form short sentences
• Uses plurals
• Answers routine questions
• Provides appropriate answers
• Comprehends some pronouns
• Follows two step directions

Social/Emotional
• Has a strong sense of ownership
• May begin cooperative play
• May show need for security object
• Is becoming more independent

Physical
• Walks backwards
• Can balance on one foot (by 3 years)
• Strings large beads
• Holds scissors correctly
• Zips and snaps
• Learns to use the potty
• Walks up and down stairs independently


Ages 4-5 Years

Cognitive
• Comprehends special concepts (e.g. around, in front, high, next)
• Rote counts up to 20
• Can complete a 6-8 piece puzzle
• Begins to understand time concepts
• Understands simple math concepts
• Recalls main details of a story

Language (Native)
• Uses possessives
• Uses double negatives
• Joins sentences
• Can answer how, who, when questions
• Follows up to 4 step directions
• Uses third person
• Tells simple jokes
• Has a 2000 word vocabulary

Social/Emotional

• Enjoys being with other children
• Has an increased drive for independence
• Expresses anger more dramatically
• Is aware of social approval or disapproval
• Performs for others
• Has pride in personal accomplishments
• Develops sex role identification
• Begins taking turns and negotiating

Physical
• Can hop on one foot, skip and jump
• Can catch a ball with both hands
• Can catch a beanbag
• Dresses and undresses him/herself
• Can copy a simple design
• Uses scissors to cut a straight line


Please see the below information to use as a guideline on typical development. It is important to remember that all children develop at different rates, and there is a wide range of “typical development” during these ages.

Please consult your child’s pediatrician if you have concerns, or contact the Early Childhood Coordinator, Melissa Ward, at 847-593-4393 or via email at [email protected]


Children’s developmental milestones

 

Ages 12-18 months

 

Cognitive
• Identifies family members in photographs
• Enjoys cause and effect relationship
• Is able to make choices between clear alternatives
• Begins to solve problems
• Remembers more

Language (Native Language)
• Has expressive vocabulary of 4-10 words (by 13-15 months)
• Has expressive vocabulary of 10-20 words (by 18 months)
• Can listen and respond to simple directions

Social/Emotional

• Prefers to keep caregiver in sight while exploring environment
• Demands personal attention
• May reveal stubbornness
• Unable to share
• Responds to simple requests

Physical
• Picks up small objects with pointer finger and thumb
• Can build a tower of cubes
• Can throw a ball
• Walks well
• Turns pages in a book
• Can walk while holding an object


Ages 18-24 months


Cognitive

• Sorts shapes and colors
• Mimics adult behavior
• Points to and names objects
• Refers to self by name
• Learns by helping
• Learns concepts such as size, shape and weight as he/she moves and plays with objects in the environment

Language (Native Language)
• Has expressive vocabulary of 20-25 words
• Uses 2-word phrases to communicate
• Uses gestures to communicate
• Begins using courtesy words (please, thank you) occasionally

Social/Emotional
• Is possessive
• Begins to show empathy
• Reveals a sense of trust
• Begins to play next to children
• Shows emotions of pride and embarrassment
• May dawdle
• Engages in imaginative play
• Tests limits of behavior
• Performs for an audience

Physical
• Can draw scribbles
• Kicks backward and forward
• Stands on a balance beam
• Walks up stairs with help
• Runs well
• Enjoys riding small-wheeled riding toys
• Drinks from a straw


Ages 2-3 Years

Cognitive
• Comprehends size
• Beginning to understand time sequences (e.g. before lunch)
• Matches shapes and colors
• Counts and manipulates objects
• Is beginning to think about consequences
• Is able to concentrate for longer periods of time

Language (Native)
• Combines words to form short sentences
• Uses plurals
• Answers routine questions
• Provides appropriate answers
• Comprehends some pronouns
• Follows two step directions

Social/Emotional
• Has a strong sense of ownership
• May begin cooperative play
• May show need for security object
• Is becoming more independent

Physical
• Walks backwards
• Can balance on one foot (by 3 years)
• Strings large beads
• Holds scissors correctly
• Zips and snaps
• Learns to use the potty
• Walks up and down stairs independently


Ages 4-5 Years

Cognitive
• Comprehends special concepts (e.g. around, in front, high, next)
• Rote counts up to 20
• Can complete a 6-8 piece puzzle
• Begins to understand time concepts
• Understands simple math concepts
• Recalls main details of a story

Language (Native)
• Uses possessives
• Uses double negatives
• Joins sentences
• Can answer how, who, when questions
• Follows up to 4 step directions
• Uses third person
• Tells simple jokes
• Has a 2000 word vocabulary

Social/Emotional

• Enjoys being with other children
• Has an increased drive for independence
• Expresses anger more dramatically
• Is aware of social approval or disapproval
• Performs for others
• Has pride in personal accomplishments
• Develops sex role identification
• Begins taking turns and negotiating

Physical
• Can hop on one foot, skip and jump
• Can catch a ball with both hands
• Can catch a beanbag
• Dresses and undresses him/herself
• Can copy a simple design
• Uses scissors to cut a straight line