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Student Behavior And ResponsibilitiesStudent Behavior And Responsibilities(es)

Standards of Behavior

School District 59 has integrated character education throughout its comprehensive school program. In order for young people to fully develop good character, it is important that they see examples of good character both during the school day, at home and throughout our community. Please visit with your child about the six character education pillars and support the development of our six pillars of character at home and school.

Six Pillars of CHARACTER COUNTS! which are part of the educational program are:

  • Trustworthiness: Be honest. Don’t deceive, cheat, or steal. Be reliable – do what you say you’ll do. Have the courage to do the right thing. Build a good reputation. Be loyal.
  • Respect: Treat others with respect; follow the Golden Rule. Be tolerant of differences. Use good manners, not bad language. Be considerate of the feelings of others. Don’t threaten, hit or hurt anyone. Deal peacefully with anger, insults and disagreements.
  • Responsibility: Do what you are supposed to do. Persevere: keep on trying! Always do your best. Use self-control. Be self-disciplined. Think before you act- consider the consequences. Be accountable for your choices.
  • Fairness: Play by the rules. Take turns and share. Be open-minded; listen to others. Don’t take advantage of others. Don’t blame others carelessly.
  • Caring: Be kind. Be compassionate and show you care. Express gratitude. Forgive others. Help people in need.
  • Citizenship: Do your share to make your school and community better. Cooperate. Stay informed; vote. Be a good neighbor. Obey laws and rules. Respect authority. Protect the environment.

Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (“PBIS”) is a program supported by the Illinois State Board of Education and the District that promotes and maximizes academic achievement and behavioral competence. PBIS places an increased emphasis on proactive approaches in which expected and more socially acceptable behaviors are directly taught, regularly practiced in the school environment, and followed by frequent positive acknowledgement.

A school that implements PBIS:

  1. Agrees on 3 to 5 positively stated expectations
  2. Instructs students on the specific rules aligned with each expectation
  3. Provides acknowledgement for following the school wide expectations
  4. Provides appropriate consequences for rule infractions and
  5. Uses behavioral data on a regular basis to evaluate the school wide support plan and to address the needs of groups of students and individual students

The underlying message within PBIS is that behavior is learned and can be explicitly taught.

School wide expectations are organized into a behavior matrix that is posted throughout the school as part of Tier One. The behavior matrix outlines the expectations in a positive manner by directing students on what to do rather than on what not to do. Students are taught the school wide expectations on one of the first days of school by participating in discussions and role plays regarding expected appropriate behavior in each school setting as it relates to each school wide expectation.

After the initial introduction of the school wide expectations, student behavior data is used to plan for opportunities to re-teach expected behaviors. Behavioral lesson plans, called “Cool Tools”, are created. Instruction is delivered in each classroom throughout the building on the specific skill identified as in need of improvement. Cool Tools involve a variety of teaching strategies including: specific skill instruction, class discussion, practice, and role playing. Positive acknowledgement is utilized consistently within the PBIS framework. All staff members who observe students displaying the specific behavior taught will issue verbal praise and a positive acknowledgement ticket to the student.

In addition, PBIS provides a framework for delivery of positive interventions and supports to groups of students or individuals who require a greater level of behavioral support than what is provided within the school wide system. Tier Two interventions are specifically designed group interventions that support students who are at-risk for developing chronic behavioral difficulties. An example of a Tier Two intervention is the Check-In/Check-Out program. Each child on Check-In/Check-Out begins and ends the day with a positive contact with an adult in the school and receives regularly scheduled positive feedback regarding their behavior throughout the day. Tier Three interventions are provided to students with chronic behaviors. Interventions at this level are individualized by a team to meet the unique behavior needs of the student. For more information about PBIS, contact the Department of Educational Services, 847-593-4335.

School District 59 believes that behavior management is best viewed as the teaching of self-control, responsibility, orderliness, and efficient management of time and abilities so that maximum learning may take place. It is an expectation that students conduct themselves as good citizens.

School District 59 has the following rules that serve as a District-wide Standard of Behavior:

  • Model the Six Pillars of CHARACTER COUNTS!: Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship. Respect for other students and for adults is expected and practiced at all times.
  • Verbal and/or physical abuse of other individuals is unacceptable at all times.
  • Flammable, sharp, dangerous, or unsafe objects, or materials such as matches, knives, pieces of metal, rope, cigarettes, or non-prescription drugs should never be brought to school, to the school grounds, or to school functions.
  • School property and school buildings shall be protected, maintained, and respected.
  • Safety and health standards and practices shall be followed by all children and adults while in school.
  • Students shall come to school on time, shall be prepared for classes, and shall be expected to have completed all homework assignments.
  • Standards for neatness in all written assignments shall be developed by teachers and shall be required of all students.
  • Follow-up procedures for rule infractions shall be practiced swiftly, consistently, and fairly by those persons who have responsibility for rule enforcement.
  • Full information related to rule infractions shall be promptly reported to parents.

When minor discipline problems occur, the teacher will make every effort to help the student develop a plan to correct the problem. The teacher may request the student to remain after school, arrange for a parent conference, or request assistance of the administration when problems reoccur or become more serious in nature. Parents are always notified when a student is requested to remain after school either via telephone contact or by allowing the student to come in the next day so that the student might inform the parent that (s)he must stay after school.


Disruptive Behavior

Disruptive behavior is that which is inappropriate to the school environment and which clearly interferes with the learning process.

Dealing with the Disruptive Student

It is recognized that the primary responsibility for the maintenance of discipline resides with the teacher. Once it has been determined by the teacher that a particular student’s behavior is disruptive and cannot be effectively modified, the student should be informed of the following by the teacher:

  1. That the type of behavior the student is engaging in is disruptive and necessitates the student’s referral to the office.
  2. That the student is, therefore, being referred to the administrator who is designated to handle disruptive students. The teacher should communicate with the office at the time of referral.

As soon as possible after the student’s arrival at the administrator’s office, the following should take place:

  1. The student should be given an opportunity to explain his/her conduct in the class, which led to the referral.
  2. The administrator should take whatever measures are necessary to assure that the student’s referral was justified and that all the facts are known.
  3. The student should be informed of the action which will be taken by the administrator as a result of the referral regarding time out in the office, a detention, etc. Parent contact should follow each referral so that parents are given the opportunity to review the circumstances of the referral with the teacher involved.
  4. In cases where the administrator determines that the referral was not justified, the student should be returned to class as quickly as possible and the administrator should instruct the teacher not to penalize the student for any work missed while the student was out of the room. The administrator should also confer with the teacher about the outcome of the referral.

Anti-Bullying Policy

The purpose of this policy is to promote consistency of approach and to create a climate in which all types of bullying are regarded as unacceptable. We wish to create a learning community in which relationships are based on mutual respect. All members of our school community have the right to enjoy their learning and leisure time free from any form of bullying or harassment. District 59 will not tolerate unkind actions or remarks, even if they lack malicious intent. We expect students, staff, and parents to support this policy by reporting all incidents of bullying.

Bullying Defined

Bullying is defined as any physical, psychological or verbal attack against an individual or group of individuals by a person or group of persons, causing, or potentially causing, physical or psychological harm to the victim(s) or resulting in the exclusion of the victim(s) from participation in, and/or enjoyment of any program or activity, including academic and nonacademic classes and extracurricular activities, offered or sponsored by the school district. The attack may be an isolated incident or series of incidences occurring over a period of time.

Bullying takes various forms, including, but not limited to, harassment, threats, intimidation, spreading rumors, stalking, physical violence, sexual harassment, sexual violence, theft, humiliation, causing social or psychological isolation, extortion, destruction of property, or retaliation for alleging an act of bullying.

Cyber-bullying Defined

“Cyber-bullying” is considered a form of bullying and is defined as the use of e-mail, instant messaging, chat rooms, pagers, cell phones, or other forms of information technology to bully, harass, embarrass, threaten, or intimidate someone. Students who engage in such activity on school grounds or who engage in such activity off campus and create a material disruption of school operations shall be subject to penalties for bullying and harassment as well as possible criminal penalties. Students’ home and personal Internet use can have an impact on the school and on other students. If a student’s personal Internet expression – such as a threatening message to another student or a violent website – creates a likelihood of material disruption of the school’s operations, that student may face school discipline and criminal penalties.


STUDENT BEHAVIOR – Prohibited Student Conduct

The school administration is authorized to discipline students for gross disobedience or misconduct, including, but not limited to:

  1. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, or selling tobacco or nicotine materials, including without limitation, electronic cigarettes.
  2. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, or selling alcoholic beverages. Students who are under the influence of an alcoholic beverage are not permitted to attend school or school functions and are treated as though they had alcohol in their possession.
  3. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, selling, or offering for sale:
  • a. Any illegal drug or controlled substance, or cannabis (including medical cannabis, marijuana, and hashish).
  • b. Any anabolic steroid unless it is being administered in accordance with a physician’s or licensed practitioner’s prescription.
  • c. Any performance-enhancing substance on the Illinois High School Association’s most current banned substance list unless administered in accordance with a physician’s or licensed practitioner’s prescription.
  • d. Any prescription drug when not prescribed for the student by a physician or licensed practitioner, or when used in a manner inconsistent with the prescription or prescribing physician’s or licensed practitioner’s instructions. The use or possession of medical cannabis, even by a student for whom medical cannabis has been prescribed, is prohibited.
  • e. Any inhalant, regardless of whether it contains an illegal drug or controlled substance: (a) that a student believes is, or represents to be capable of, causing intoxication, hallucination, excitement, or dulling of the brain or nervous system; or (b) about which the student engaged in behavior that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the student intended the inhalant to cause intoxication, hallucination, excitement, or dulling of the brain or nervous system. The prohibition in this section does not apply to a student’s use of asthma or other legally prescribed inhalant medications.
  • f. Any substance inhaled, injected, smoked, consumed, or otherwise ingested or absorbed with the intention of causing a physiological or psychological change in the body, including without limitation, pure caffeine in tablet or powdered form.
  • g. “Look-alike” or counterfeit drugs, including a substance that is not prohibited by this policy, but one: (a) that a student believes to be, or represents to be, an illegal drug, controlled substance, or other substance that is prohibited by this policy; or (b) about which a student engaged in behavior that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the student expressly or impliedly represented to be an illegal drug, controlled substance, or other substance that is prohibited by this policy.
  • h. Drug paraphernalia, including devices that are or can be used to: (a) ingest, inhale, or inject cannabis or controlled substances into the body; and (b) grow, process, store, or conceal cannabis or controlled substances. Students who are under the influence of any prohibited substance are not permitted to attend school or school functions and are treated as though they had the prohibited substance, as applicable, in their possession.

4. Using, possessing, controlling, or transferring a “weapon” as that term is defined in the Weapons section of this policy, or violating the Weapons section of this policy.

5. Using or possessing a cellular telephone, electronic signaling device, two-way radio, video recording device, and/or other telecommunication device, unless authorized and approved by the Building Principal.

6. Using or possessing a laser pointer unless under a staff member’s direct supervision and in the context of instruction.

7. Disobeying rules of student conduct or directives from staff members or school officials. Examples of disobeying staff directives include refusing a District staff member’s request to stop, present school identification, or submit to a search.

8. Engaging in academic dishonesty, including cheating, intentionally plagiarizing, wrongfully giving or receiving help during an academic examination, altering report cards, and wrongfully obtaining test copies or scores.

9. Engaging in hazing or any kind of bullying or aggressive behavior that does physical or psychological harm to a staff person or another student, or urging other students to engage in such conduct. Prohibited conduct specifically includes, without limitation, any use of violence, intimidation, force, noise, coercion, threats, stalking, harassment, sexual harassment, public humiliation, theft or destruction of property, retaliation, hazing, bullying, bullying using a school computer or a school computer network, or other comparable conduct.

10. Engaging in any sexual activity, including without limitation, offensive touching, sexual harassment, indecent exposure (including mooning), and sexual assault. This does not include the non-disruptive: (a) expression of gender or sexual orientation or preference, or (b) display of affection during non-instructional time.

11. Teen dating violence, as described in Board policy 7:185, Teen Dating Violence Prohibited.

12. Causing or attempting to cause damage to, or stealing or attempting to steal, school property or another person’s personal property.

13. Entering school property or a school facility without proper authorization.

14. In the absence of a reasonable belief that an emergency exists, calling emergency responders (such as calling 911); signaling or setting off alarms or signals indicating the presence of an emergency; or indicating the presence of a bomb or explosive device on school grounds, school bus, or at any school activity.

15. Being absent without a recognized excuse; State law and School Board policy regarding truancy control will be used with chronic and habitual truants.

16. Being involved with any public school fraternity, sorority, or secret society, by: (a) being a member; (b) promising to join; (c) pledging to become a member; or (d) soliciting any other person to join, promise to join, or be pledged to become a member.

17. Being involved in gangs or gang-related activities, including displaying gang symbols or paraphernalia.

18. Violating any criminal law, including but not limited to, assault, battery, arson, theft, gambling, eavesdropping, vandalism, and hazing.

19. Making an explicit threat on an Internet website against a school employee, a student, or any school-related personnel if the Internet website through which the threat was made is a site that was accessible within the school at the time the threat was made or was available to third parties who worked or studied within the school grounds at the time the threat was made, and the threat could be reasonably interpreted as threatening to the safety and security of the threatened individual because of his or her duties or employment status or status as a student inside the school.

20. Operating an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or drone for any purpose on school grounds or at any school event unless granted permission by the Superintendent or designee.

21. Engaging in any activity, on or off campus, that interferes with, disrupts, or adversely affects the school environment, school operations, or an educational function, including but not limited to, conduct that may reasonably be considered to: (a) be a threat or an attempted intimidation of a staff member; or (b) endanger the health or safety of students, staff, or school property.

For purposes of this policy, the term “possession” includes having control, custody, or care, currently or in the past, of an object or substance, including situations in which the item is: (a) on the student’s person; (b) contained in another item belonging to, or under the control of, the student, such as in the student’s clothing, backpack, or automobile; (c) in a school’s student locker, desk, or other school property; or (d) at any location on school property or at a school-sponsored event.

Efforts, including the use of positive interventions and supports, shall be made to deter students, while at school or a school-related event, from engaging in aggressive behavior that may reasonably produce physical or psychological harm to someone else. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the parent/guardian of a student who engages in aggressive behavior is notified of the incident. The failure to provide such notification does not limit the Board’s authority to impose discipline, including suspension or expulsion, for such behavior.

No disciplinary action shall be taken against any student that is based totally or in part on the refusal of the student’s parent/guardian to administer or consent to the administration of psychotropic or psychostimulant medication to the student.

Disciplinary Measures

School officials shall limit the number and duration of expulsions and out-of-school suspensions to the greatest extent practicable, and, where practicable and reasonable, shall consider forms of non-exclusionary discipline before using out-of-school suspensions or expulsions. School personnel shall not advise or encourage students to drop out voluntarily due to behavioral or academic difficulties. Potential disciplinary measures include, without limitation, any of the following:

  1. Notifying parent(s)/guardian(s).
  2. Disciplinary conference.
  3. Withholding of privileges.
  4. Temporary removal from the classroom.
  5. Return of property or restitution for lost, stolen, or damaged property.
  6. In-school suspension. The Building Principal or designee shall ensure that the student is properly supervised.
  7. After-school study or Saturday study provided the student’s parent/guardian has been notified. If transportation arrangements cannot be agreed upon, an alternative disciplinary measure must be used. The student must be supervised by the detaining teacher or the Building Principal or designee.
  8. Community service with local public and nonprofit agencies that enhances community efforts to meet human, educational, environmental, or public safety needs. The District will not provide transportation. School administration shall use this option only as an alternative to another disciplinary measure, giving the student and/or parent/guardian the choice.
  9. Seizure of contraband; confiscation and temporary retention of personal property that was used to violate this policy or school disciplinary rules.
  10. Suspension of bus riding privileges in accordance with Board policy 7:220, Bus Conduct.
  11. Out-of-school suspension from school and all school activities in accordance with Board policy 7:200, Suspension Procedures. A student who has been suspended shall also be restricted from being on school grounds and at school activities.
  12. Expulsion from school and all school activities for a definite time period not to exceed 2 calendar years in accordance with Board policy 7:210, Expulsion Procedures. A student who has been expelled shall also be restricted from being on school grounds and at school activities.
  13. Transfer to an alternative program if the student is expelled or otherwise qualifies for the transfer under State law. The transfer shall be in the manner provided in Article 13A or 13B of the School Code.
  14. Notifying juvenile authorities or other law enforcement whenever the conduct involves criminal activity, including but not limited to, illegal drugs (controlled substances), “look-alikes,” alcohol, or weapons or in other circumstances as authorized by the reciprocal reporting agreement between the District and local law enforcement agencies.

The above list of disciplinary measures is a range of options that will not always be applicable in every case. In some circumstances, it may not be possible to avoid suspending or expelling a student because behavioral interventions, other than a suspension and expulsion, will not be appropriate and available, and the only reasonable and practical way to resolve the threat and/or address the disruption is a suspension or expulsion.

Corporal punishment is prohibited. Corporal punishment is defined as slapping, paddling, or prolonged maintenance of students in physically painful positions, or intentional infliction of bodily harm. Corporal punishment does not include reasonable force as needed to maintain safety for students, staff, or other persons, or for the purpose of self-defense or defense of property.

School staff members shall not use isolated time out and physical restraints other than as permitted in Section 10-20.33 of the School Code, State Board of Education rules, and procedures developed by the Superintendent. Neither isolated time out nor physical restraints shall be used to discipline or punish a student.

Weapons
A student who is determined to have brought one of the following objects to school, any school-sponsored activity or event, or any activity or event that bears a reasonable relationship to school shall be expelled for a period of at least one calendar year but not more than 2 calendar years:

  1. A firearm, meaning any gun, rifle, shotgun, or weapon as defined by Section 921 of Title 18 of the United States Code (18 U.S.C. § 921), firearm as defined in Section 1.1 of the Firearm Owners Identification Card Act (430 ILCS 65/), or firearm as defined in Section 24-1 of the Criminal Code of 1961 (720 ILCS 5/24-1).
  2. A knife, brass knuckles, or other knuckle weapon regardless of its composition, a billy club, or any other object if used or attempted to be used to cause bodily harm, including “look alikes” of any firearm as defined above.

The expulsion requirement under either paragraph 1 or 2 above may be modified by the Superintendent, and the Superintendent’s determination may be modified by the Board on a case-by-case basis. The Superintendent or designee may grant an exception to this policy, upon the prior request of an adult supervisor, for students in theatre, cooking, ROTC, martial arts, and similar programs, whether or not school-sponsored, provided the item is not equipped, nor intended, to do bodily harm.

This policy’s prohibitions concerning weapons apply regardless of whether: (1) a student is licensed to carry a concealed firearm, or (2) the Board permits visitors, who are licensed to carry a concealed firearm, to store a firearm in a locked vehicle in a school parking area.

Re-Engagement of Returning Students
The Superintendent or designee shall maintain a process to facilitate the re-engagement of students who are returning from an out-of-school suspension, expulsion, or an alternative school setting. The goal of re-engagement shall be to support the student’s ability to be successful in school following a period of exclusionary discipline and shall include the opportunity for students who have been suspended to complete or make up work for equivalent academic credit.

Required Notices
A school staff member shall immediately notify the Building Principal in the event that he or she:

(1) observes any person in possession of a firearm on or around school grounds; however, such action may be delayed if immediate notice would endanger students under his or her supervision,
(2) observes or has reason to suspect that any person on school grounds is or was involved in a drug-related incident, or
(3) observes a battery committed against any staff member.

Upon receiving such a report, the Building Principal or designee shall immediately notify the local law enforcement agency, State Police, and the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s). “School grounds” includes modes of transportation to school activities and any public way within 1000 feet of the school, as well as school property itself.

Efforts, including the use of early intervention and progressive discipline, shall be made to deter students, while at school or a school-related event, from engaging in aggressive behavior that may reasonably produce physical or physiological harm to someone else. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the parent(s)/guardian(s) of a student who engages in aggressive behavior are notified of the incident. The failure to provide such notification does not limit the Board’s authority to impose discipline, including suspension or expulsion, for such behavior.

Delegation of Authority
Each teacher, and any other school personnel when students are under his or her charge, is authorized to impose any disciplinary measure, other than suspension, expulsion, corporal punishment or in-school suspension, which is appropriate and in accordance with the policies and rules on student discipline. Teachers, other certificated educational employees, and other persons providing a related service for or with respect to a student, may use reasonable force as needed to maintain safety for other students, school personnel, or other persons, or for the purpose of self-defense or defense of property. Teachers may remove students from a classroom for disruptive behavior.

The Superintendent, Building Principal, Assistant Building Principal, or Dean of Students is authorized to impose the same disciplinary measures as teachers and may suspend students guilty of gross disobedience or misconduct from school (including all school functions) and from riding the school bus, up to 10 consecutive school days, provided the appropriate procedures are followed. The School Board may suspend a student from riding the bus in excess of 10 days for safety reasons.


Isolated Time Out And Physical Restraint

Purpose and Definitions
The Board of Education Policy 7:235 governs the use of isolated time out and physical restraint in accordance with the requirements of the Illinois School Code, 105 ILCS 5/2-3.130 and 10-20.33, and Illinois Administrative Code, 23 Ill. Admin. Code §§ 1.280 and 1.285.

Isolated time out means the confinement of a student in an enclosure, whether within or outside the classroom, from which the student’s egress is restricted.

Physical restraint means holding a student or otherwise restricting his or her movements through the use of specific, planned techniques. Physical restraint does not include momentary person-to-person contact, without the use of materials or mechanical devices, accomplished with limited force, to (1) prevent a student from completing an act that could result in potential harm to him/herself or others, or damage to property, or (2) remove a disruptive student who is unwilling to leave the area.

Use of Isolated Time Out and Physical Restraint
Isolated time out and physical restraint shall only be used as a means of maintaining a safe and orderly environment for learning, and only to the extent that they are necessary to preserve the safety of students and others. Isolated time out and physical restraint shall not be used as a form of punishment.

In addition, physical restraint shall not be used unless the student:

(1) poses a physical risk to him/herself or others,
(2) there is no medical contraindication to its use, and
(3) the staff assigned to special programs applying the restraint has been trained in its safe application pursuant to State of Illinois regulations.

A verbal threat is not considered a physical risk unless the student also demonstrates a means of or intent to carry out the threat. Mechanical or chemical restraints will not be used under any circumstances, and medically prescribed restraint procedures will not be used for purposes of maintaining discipline.

Written Procedures
Written procedures governing the use of isolated time out and physical restraint have been developed by the Superintendent or his/her designee. School staff must follow these written procedures whenever isolated time out or physical restraint is used. Parents may obtain a copy of such procedures by contacting the office of the Executive Director for Educational Services.

Maintenance of Documentation
Whenever isolated time out or physical restraint is used, the student’s case manager shall be notified as soon as possible, and shall document the incident as set forth in the procedures governing isolated time out and physical restraint.

Evaluation of Incidents Resulting in Injury
Any incident that results in a serious injury to the student (as determined by the student, responsible parent or guardian, staff or other individual) shall be reported to the Superintendent or his/her designee. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall investigate and evaluate the incident.

Alternative Behavioral Strategies
Positive, non-aversive behavioral interventions designed to develop and strengthen desirable student behaviors should be used when they are likely to be effective. Such non-restrictive interventions are identified in the School District 59 Recommended Behavioral Intervention Procedures for Students with Disabilities. More restrictive behavior interventions, such as isolated time out or physical restraint, shall be used sparingly and approached with caution.

Annual Review of Isolated Time Out and Physical Restraint
At least annually, the Superintendent or his/her designee shall review the use of isolated time out and physical restraint, including.

(1) the number of incidents involving isolated time out and/or physical restraint;
(2) the location and duration of each incident;
(3) the staff members involved;
(4) any injuries or property damage that occurred; and
(5) the timeliness of parental notification and administrative review.


Search and Seizure

For the safety and supervision of students in the absence of parent(s)/guardian(s), to maintain discipline and order in schools, and to provide for the health, safety, and welfare of students and staff, school authorities are authorized to conduct searches of students and their personal effects, as well as District property.

School authorities may inspect and search school property and equipment owned or controlled by the school (such as lockers, desks, and parking lots), as well as personal effects left there by a student, without notice to or the consent of the student. Students have no reasonable expectation of privacy in these places or areas or in their personal effects left there.

The Superintendent may request the assistance of law enforcement officials to conduct inspections and searches of lockers, desks, parking lots, and other school property and equipment for illegal drugs, weapons, or other illegal or dangerous substances or materials, including searches conducted through the use of specially trained dogs.

Students

School authorities may search a student and/or the student’s personal effects (e.g., purses, wallets, knapsacks, book bags, lunch boxes, etc.) when there is a reasonable ground for suspecting that the search will produce evidence the particular student has violated or is violating either the law or the District’s student conduct rules. The search itself must be conducted in a manner that is reasonably related to its objectives and not excessively intrusive in light of the age and sex of the student and the nature of the infraction.

When feasible, the search should be conducted as follows:

•   Outside the view of others, including students;
•   In the presence of a school administrator or adult witness;
•   By a certificated employee or administrator of the same sex as the student.

Seizure of Property
If a search produces evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the District’s policies or rules, such evidence may be seized and impounded by school authorities, and disciplinary action may be taken. When appropriate, such evidence may be transferred to law enforcement authorities.


Notification Regarding Student Accounts or Profiles on Social Networking Websites

The Superintendent or designee shall notify students and their parents/guardians of each of the following in accordance with the Right to Privacy in the School Setting Act, 105 ILCS 75/:

  1. School officials may not request or require a student or his or her parent/guardian to provide a password or other related account information to gain access to the student’s account or profile on a social networking website.
  2. School officials may conduct an investigation or require a student to cooperate in an investigation if there is specific information about activity on the student’s account on a social networking website that violates a school disciplinary rule or policy. In the course of an investigation, the student may be required to share the content that is reported in order to allow school officials to make a factual determination.

 

Standards of Behavior

School District 59 has integrated character education throughout its comprehensive school program. In order for young people to fully develop good character, it is important that they see examples of good character both during the school day, at home and throughout our community. Please visit with your child about the six character education pillars and support the development of our six pillars of character at home and school.

Six Pillars of CHARACTER COUNTS! which are part of the educational program are:

  • Trustworthiness: Be honest. Don’t deceive, cheat, or steal. Be reliable – do what you say you’ll do. Have the courage to do the right thing. Build a good reputation. Be loyal.
  • Respect: Treat others with respect; follow the Golden Rule. Be tolerant of differences. Use good manners, not bad language. Be considerate of the feelings of others. Don’t threaten, hit or hurt anyone. Deal peacefully with anger, insults and disagreements.
  • Responsibility: Do what you are supposed to do. Persevere: keep on trying! Always do your best. Use self-control. Be self-disciplined. Think before you act- consider the consequences. Be accountable for your choices.
  • Fairness: Play by the rules. Take turns and share. Be open-minded; listen to others. Don’t take advantage of others. Don’t blame others carelessly.
  • Caring: Be kind. Be compassionate and show you care. Express gratitude. Forgive others. Help people in need.
  • Citizenship: Do your share to make your school and community better. Cooperate. Stay informed; vote. Be a good neighbor. Obey laws and rules. Respect authority. Protect the environment.

Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (“PBIS”) is a program supported by the Illinois State Board of Education and the District that promotes and maximizes academic achievement and behavioral competence. PBIS places an increased emphasis on proactive approaches in which expected and more socially acceptable behaviors are directly taught, regularly practiced in the school environment, and followed by frequent positive acknowledgement.

A school that implements PBIS:

  1. Agrees on 3 to 5 positively stated expectations
  2. Instructs students on the specific rules aligned with each expectation
  3. Provides acknowledgement for following the school wide expectations
  4. Provides appropriate consequences for rule infractions and
  5. Uses behavioral data on a regular basis to evaluate the school wide support plan and to address the needs of groups of students and individual students

The underlying message within PBIS is that behavior is learned and can be explicitly taught.

School wide expectations are organized into a behavior matrix that is posted throughout the school as part of Tier One. The behavior matrix outlines the expectations in a positive manner by directing students on what to do rather than on what not to do. Students are taught the school wide expectations on one of the first days of school by participating in discussions and role plays regarding expected appropriate behavior in each school setting as it relates to each school wide expectation.

After the initial introduction of the school wide expectations, student behavior data is used to plan for opportunities to re-teach expected behaviors. Behavioral lesson plans, called “Cool Tools”, are created. Instruction is delivered in each classroom throughout the building on the specific skill identified as in need of improvement. Cool Tools involve a variety of teaching strategies including: specific skill instruction, class discussion, practice, and role playing. Positive acknowledgement is utilized consistently within the PBIS framework. All staff members who observe students displaying the specific behavior taught will issue verbal praise and a positive acknowledgement ticket to the student.

In addition, PBIS provides a framework for delivery of positive interventions and supports to groups of students or individuals who require a greater level of behavioral support than what is provided within the school wide system. Tier Two interventions are specifically designed group interventions that support students who are at-risk for developing chronic behavioral difficulties. An example of a Tier Two intervention is the Check-In/Check-Out program. Each child on Check-In/Check-Out begins and ends the day with a positive contact with an adult in the school and receives regularly scheduled positive feedback regarding their behavior throughout the day. Tier Three interventions are provided to students with chronic behaviors. Interventions at this level are individualized by a team to meet the unique behavior needs of the student. For more information about PBIS, contact the Department of Educational Services, 847-593-4335.

School District 59 believes that behavior management is best viewed as the teaching of self-control, responsibility, orderliness, and efficient management of time and abilities so that maximum learning may take place. It is an expectation that students conduct themselves as good citizens.

School District 59 has the following rules that serve as a District-wide Standard of Behavior:

  • Model the Six Pillars of CHARACTER COUNTS!: Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship. Respect for other students and for adults is expected and practiced at all times.
  • Verbal and/or physical abuse of other individuals is unacceptable at all times.
  • Flammable, sharp, dangerous, or unsafe objects, or materials such as matches, knives, pieces of metal, rope, cigarettes, or non-prescription drugs should never be brought to school, to the school grounds, or to school functions.
  • School property and school buildings shall be protected, maintained, and respected.
  • Safety and health standards and practices shall be followed by all children and adults while in school.
  • Students shall come to school on time, shall be prepared for classes, and shall be expected to have completed all homework assignments.
  • Standards for neatness in all written assignments shall be developed by teachers and shall be required of all students.
  • Follow-up procedures for rule infractions shall be practiced swiftly, consistently, and fairly by those persons who have responsibility for rule enforcement.
  • Full information related to rule infractions shall be promptly reported to parents.

When minor discipline problems occur, the teacher will make every effort to help the student develop a plan to correct the problem. The teacher may request the student to remain after school, arrange for a parent conference, or request assistance of the administration when problems reoccur or become more serious in nature. Parents are always notified when a student is requested to remain after school either via telephone contact or by allowing the student to come in the next day so that the student might inform the parent that (s)he must stay after school.


Disruptive Behavior

Disruptive behavior is that which is inappropriate to the school environment and which clearly interferes with the learning process.

Dealing with the Disruptive Student

It is recognized that the primary responsibility for the maintenance of discipline resides with the teacher. Once it has been determined by the teacher that a particular student’s behavior is disruptive and cannot be effectively modified, the student should be informed of the following by the teacher:

  1. That the type of behavior the student is engaging in is disruptive and necessitates the student’s referral to the office.
  2. That the student is, therefore, being referred to the administrator who is designated to handle disruptive students. The teacher should communicate with the office at the time of referral.

As soon as possible after the student’s arrival at the administrator’s office, the following should take place:

  1. The student should be given an opportunity to explain his/her conduct in the class, which led to the referral.
  2. The administrator should take whatever measures are necessary to assure that the student’s referral was justified and that all the facts are known.
  3. The student should be informed of the action which will be taken by the administrator as a result of the referral regarding time out in the office, a detention, etc. Parent contact should follow each referral so that parents are given the opportunity to review the circumstances of the referral with the teacher involved.
  4. In cases where the administrator determines that the referral was not justified, the student should be returned to class as quickly as possible and the administrator should instruct the teacher not to penalize the student for any work missed while the student was out of the room. The administrator should also confer with the teacher about the outcome of the referral.

Anti-Bullying Policy

The purpose of this policy is to promote consistency of approach and to create a climate in which all types of bullying are regarded as unacceptable. We wish to create a learning community in which relationships are based on mutual respect. All members of our school community have the right to enjoy their learning and leisure time free from any form of bullying or harassment. District 59 will not tolerate unkind actions or remarks, even if they lack malicious intent. We expect students, staff, and parents to support this policy by reporting all incidents of bullying.

Bullying Defined

Bullying is defined as any physical, psychological or verbal attack against an individual or group of individuals by a person or group of persons, causing, or potentially causing, physical or psychological harm to the victim(s) or resulting in the exclusion of the victim(s) from participation in, and/or enjoyment of any program or activity, including academic and nonacademic classes and extracurricular activities, offered or sponsored by the school district. The attack may be an isolated incident or series of incidences occurring over a period of time.

Bullying takes various forms, including, but not limited to, harassment, threats, intimidation, spreading rumors, stalking, physical violence, sexual harassment, sexual violence, theft, humiliation, causing social or psychological isolation, extortion, destruction of property, or retaliation for alleging an act of bullying.

Cyber-bullying Defined

“Cyber-bullying” is considered a form of bullying and is defined as the use of e-mail, instant messaging, chat rooms, pagers, cell phones, or other forms of information technology to bully, harass, embarrass, threaten, or intimidate someone. Students who engage in such activity on school grounds or who engage in such activity off campus and create a material disruption of school operations shall be subject to penalties for bullying and harassment as well as possible criminal penalties. Students’ home and personal Internet use can have an impact on the school and on other students. If a student’s personal Internet expression – such as a threatening message to another student or a violent website – creates a likelihood of material disruption of the school’s operations, that student may face school discipline and criminal penalties.


STUDENT BEHAVIOR – Prohibited Student Conduct

The school administration is authorized to discipline students for gross disobedience or misconduct, including, but not limited to:

  1. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, or selling tobacco or nicotine materials, including without limitation, electronic cigarettes.
  2. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, or selling alcoholic beverages. Students who are under the influence of an alcoholic beverage are not permitted to attend school or school functions and are treated as though they had alcohol in their possession.
  3. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, selling, or offering for sale:
  • a. Any illegal drug or controlled substance, or cannabis (including medical cannabis, marijuana, and hashish).
  • b. Any anabolic steroid unless it is being administered in accordance with a physician’s or licensed practitioner’s prescription.
  • c. Any performance-enhancing substance on the Illinois High School Association’s most current banned substance list unless administered in accordance with a physician’s or licensed practitioner’s prescription.
  • d. Any prescription drug when not prescribed for the student by a physician or licensed practitioner, or when used in a manner inconsistent with the prescription or prescribing physician’s or licensed practitioner’s instructions. The use or possession of medical cannabis, even by a student for whom medical cannabis has been prescribed, is prohibited.
  • e. Any inhalant, regardless of whether it contains an illegal drug or controlled substance: (a) that a student believes is, or represents to be capable of, causing intoxication, hallucination, excitement, or dulling of the brain or nervous system; or (b) about which the student engaged in behavior that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the student intended the inhalant to cause intoxication, hallucination, excitement, or dulling of the brain or nervous system. The prohibition in this section does not apply to a student’s use of asthma or other legally prescribed inhalant medications.
  • f. Any substance inhaled, injected, smoked, consumed, or otherwise ingested or absorbed with the intention of causing a physiological or psychological change in the body, including without limitation, pure caffeine in tablet or powdered form.
  • g. “Look-alike” or counterfeit drugs, including a substance that is not prohibited by this policy, but one: (a) that a student believes to be, or represents to be, an illegal drug, controlled substance, or other substance that is prohibited by this policy; or (b) about which a student engaged in behavior that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the student expressly or impliedly represented to be an illegal drug, controlled substance, or other substance that is prohibited by this policy.
  • h. Drug paraphernalia, including devices that are or can be used to: (a) ingest, inhale, or inject cannabis or controlled substances into the body; and (b) grow, process, store, or conceal cannabis or controlled substances. Students who are under the influence of any prohibited substance are not permitted to attend school or school functions and are treated as though they had the prohibited substance, as applicable, in their possession.

4. Using, possessing, controlling, or transferring a “weapon” as that term is defined in the Weapons section of this policy, or violating the Weapons section of this policy.

5. Using or possessing a cellular telephone, electronic signaling device, two-way radio, video recording device, and/or other telecommunication device, unless authorized and approved by the Building Principal.

6. Using or possessing a laser pointer unless under a staff member’s direct supervision and in the context of instruction.

7. Disobeying rules of student conduct or directives from staff members or school officials. Examples of disobeying staff directives include refusing a District staff member’s request to stop, present school identification, or submit to a search.

8. Engaging in academic dishonesty, including cheating, intentionally plagiarizing, wrongfully giving or receiving help during an academic examination, altering report cards, and wrongfully obtaining test copies or scores.

9. Engaging in hazing or any kind of bullying or aggressive behavior that does physical or psychological harm to a staff person or another student, or urging other students to engage in such conduct. Prohibited conduct specifically includes, without limitation, any use of violence, intimidation, force, noise, coercion, threats, stalking, harassment, sexual harassment, public humiliation, theft or destruction of property, retaliation, hazing, bullying, bullying using a school computer or a school computer network, or other comparable conduct.

10. Engaging in any sexual activity, including without limitation, offensive touching, sexual harassment, indecent exposure (including mooning), and sexual assault. This does not include the non-disruptive: (a) expression of gender or sexual orientation or preference, or (b) display of affection during non-instructional time.

11. Teen dating violence, as described in Board policy 7:185, Teen Dating Violence Prohibited.

12. Causing or attempting to cause damage to, or stealing or attempting to steal, school property or another person’s personal property.

13. Entering school property or a school facility without proper authorization.

14. In the absence of a reasonable belief that an emergency exists, calling emergency responders (such as calling 911); signaling or setting off alarms or signals indicating the presence of an emergency; or indicating the presence of a bomb or explosive device on school grounds, school bus, or at any school activity.

15. Being absent without a recognized excuse; State law and School Board policy regarding truancy control will be used with chronic and habitual truants.

16. Being involved with any public school fraternity, sorority, or secret society, by: (a) being a member; (b) promising to join; (c) pledging to become a member; or (d) soliciting any other person to join, promise to join, or be pledged to become a member.

17. Being involved in gangs or gang-related activities, including displaying gang symbols or paraphernalia.

18. Violating any criminal law, including but not limited to, assault, battery, arson, theft, gambling, eavesdropping, vandalism, and hazing.

19. Making an explicit threat on an Internet website against a school employee, a student, or any school-related personnel if the Internet website through which the threat was made is a site that was accessible within the school at the time the threat was made or was available to third parties who worked or studied within the school grounds at the time the threat was made, and the threat could be reasonably interpreted as threatening to the safety and security of the threatened individual because of his or her duties or employment status or status as a student inside the school.

20. Operating an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or drone for any purpose on school grounds or at any school event unless granted permission by the Superintendent or designee.

21. Engaging in any activity, on or off campus, that interferes with, disrupts, or adversely affects the school environment, school operations, or an educational function, including but not limited to, conduct that may reasonably be considered to: (a) be a threat or an attempted intimidation of a staff member; or (b) endanger the health or safety of students, staff, or school property.

For purposes of this policy, the term “possession” includes having control, custody, or care, currently or in the past, of an object or substance, including situations in which the item is: (a) on the student’s person; (b) contained in another item belonging to, or under the control of, the student, such as in the student’s clothing, backpack, or automobile; (c) in a school’s student locker, desk, or other school property; or (d) at any location on school property or at a school-sponsored event.

Efforts, including the use of positive interventions and supports, shall be made to deter students, while at school or a school-related event, from engaging in aggressive behavior that may reasonably produce physical or psychological harm to someone else. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the parent/guardian of a student who engages in aggressive behavior is notified of the incident. The failure to provide such notification does not limit the Board’s authority to impose discipline, including suspension or expulsion, for such behavior.

No disciplinary action shall be taken against any student that is based totally or in part on the refusal of the student’s parent/guardian to administer or consent to the administration of psychotropic or psychostimulant medication to the student.

Disciplinary Measures

School officials shall limit the number and duration of expulsions and out-of-school suspensions to the greatest extent practicable, and, where practicable and reasonable, shall consider forms of non-exclusionary discipline before using out-of-school suspensions or expulsions. School personnel shall not advise or encourage students to drop out voluntarily due to behavioral or academic difficulties. Potential disciplinary measures include, without limitation, any of the following:

  1. Notifying parent(s)/guardian(s).
  2. Disciplinary conference.
  3. Withholding of privileges.
  4. Temporary removal from the classroom.
  5. Return of property or restitution for lost, stolen, or damaged property.
  6. In-school suspension. The Building Principal or designee shall ensure that the student is properly supervised.
  7. After-school study or Saturday study provided the student’s parent/guardian has been notified. If transportation arrangements cannot be agreed upon, an alternative disciplinary measure must be used. The student must be supervised by the detaining teacher or the Building Principal or designee.
  8. Community service with local public and nonprofit agencies that enhances community efforts to meet human, educational, environmental, or public safety needs. The District will not provide transportation. School administration shall use this option only as an alternative to another disciplinary measure, giving the student and/or parent/guardian the choice.
  9. Seizure of contraband; confiscation and temporary retention of personal property that was used to violate this policy or school disciplinary rules.
  10. Suspension of bus riding privileges in accordance with Board policy 7:220, Bus Conduct.
  11. Out-of-school suspension from school and all school activities in accordance with Board policy 7:200, Suspension Procedures. A student who has been suspended shall also be restricted from being on school grounds and at school activities.
  12. Expulsion from school and all school activities for a definite time period not to exceed 2 calendar years in accordance with Board policy 7:210, Expulsion Procedures. A student who has been expelled shall also be restricted from being on school grounds and at school activities.
  13. Transfer to an alternative program if the student is expelled or otherwise qualifies for the transfer under State law. The transfer shall be in the manner provided in Article 13A or 13B of the School Code.
  14. Notifying juvenile authorities or other law enforcement whenever the conduct involves criminal activity, including but not limited to, illegal drugs (controlled substances), “look-alikes,” alcohol, or weapons or in other circumstances as authorized by the reciprocal reporting agreement between the District and local law enforcement agencies.

The above list of disciplinary measures is a range of options that will not always be applicable in every case. In some circumstances, it may not be possible to avoid suspending or expelling a student because behavioral interventions, other than a suspension and expulsion, will not be appropriate and available, and the only reasonable and practical way to resolve the threat and/or address the disruption is a suspension or expulsion.

Corporal punishment is prohibited. Corporal punishment is defined as slapping, paddling, or prolonged maintenance of students in physically painful positions, or intentional infliction of bodily harm. Corporal punishment does not include reasonable force as needed to maintain safety for students, staff, or other persons, or for the purpose of self-defense or defense of property.

School staff members shall not use isolated time out and physical restraints other than as permitted in Section 10-20.33 of the School Code, State Board of Education rules, and procedures developed by the Superintendent. Neither isolated time out nor physical restraints shall be used to discipline or punish a student.

Weapons
A student who is determined to have brought one of the following objects to school, any school-sponsored activity or event, or any activity or event that bears a reasonable relationship to school shall be expelled for a period of at least one calendar year but not more than 2 calendar years:

  1. A firearm, meaning any gun, rifle, shotgun, or weapon as defined by Section 921 of Title 18 of the United States Code (18 U.S.C. § 921), firearm as defined in Section 1.1 of the Firearm Owners Identification Card Act (430 ILCS 65/), or firearm as defined in Section 24-1 of the Criminal Code of 1961 (720 ILCS 5/24-1).
  2. A knife, brass knuckles, or other knuckle weapon regardless of its composition, a billy club, or any other object if used or attempted to be used to cause bodily harm, including “look alikes” of any firearm as defined above.

The expulsion requirement under either paragraph 1 or 2 above may be modified by the Superintendent, and the Superintendent’s determination may be modified by the Board on a case-by-case basis. The Superintendent or designee may grant an exception to this policy, upon the prior request of an adult supervisor, for students in theatre, cooking, ROTC, martial arts, and similar programs, whether or not school-sponsored, provided the item is not equipped, nor intended, to do bodily harm.

This policy’s prohibitions concerning weapons apply regardless of whether: (1) a student is licensed to carry a concealed firearm, or (2) the Board permits visitors, who are licensed to carry a concealed firearm, to store a firearm in a locked vehicle in a school parking area.

Re-Engagement of Returning Students
The Superintendent or designee shall maintain a process to facilitate the re-engagement of students who are returning from an out-of-school suspension, expulsion, or an alternative school setting. The goal of re-engagement shall be to support the student’s ability to be successful in school following a period of exclusionary discipline and shall include the opportunity for students who have been suspended to complete or make up work for equivalent academic credit.

Required Notices
A school staff member shall immediately notify the Building Principal in the event that he or she:

(1) observes any person in possession of a firearm on or around school grounds; however, such action may be delayed if immediate notice would endanger students under his or her supervision,
(2) observes or has reason to suspect that any person on school grounds is or was involved in a drug-related incident, or
(3) observes a battery committed against any staff member.

Upon receiving such a report, the Building Principal or designee shall immediately notify the local law enforcement agency, State Police, and the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s). “School grounds” includes modes of transportation to school activities and any public way within 1000 feet of the school, as well as school property itself.

Efforts, including the use of early intervention and progressive discipline, shall be made to deter students, while at school or a school-related event, from engaging in aggressive behavior that may reasonably produce physical or physiological harm to someone else. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the parent(s)/guardian(s) of a student who engages in aggressive behavior are notified of the incident. The failure to provide such notification does not limit the Board’s authority to impose discipline, including suspension or expulsion, for such behavior.

Delegation of Authority
Each teacher, and any other school personnel when students are under his or her charge, is authorized to impose any disciplinary measure, other than suspension, expulsion, corporal punishment or in-school suspension, which is appropriate and in accordance with the policies and rules on student discipline. Teachers, other certificated educational employees, and other persons providing a related service for or with respect to a student, may use reasonable force as needed to maintain safety for other students, school personnel, or other persons, or for the purpose of self-defense or defense of property. Teachers may remove students from a classroom for disruptive behavior.

The Superintendent, Building Principal, Assistant Building Principal, or Dean of Students is authorized to impose the same disciplinary measures as teachers and may suspend students guilty of gross disobedience or misconduct from school (including all school functions) and from riding the school bus, up to 10 consecutive school days, provided the appropriate procedures are followed. The School Board may suspend a student from riding the bus in excess of 10 days for safety reasons.


Isolated Time Out And Physical Restraint

Purpose and Definitions
The Board of Education Policy 7:235 governs the use of isolated time out and physical restraint in accordance with the requirements of the Illinois School Code, 105 ILCS 5/2-3.130 and 10-20.33, and Illinois Administrative Code, 23 Ill. Admin. Code §§ 1.280 and 1.285.

Isolated time out means the confinement of a student in an enclosure, whether within or outside the classroom, from which the student’s egress is restricted.

Physical restraint means holding a student or otherwise restricting his or her movements through the use of specific, planned techniques. Physical restraint does not include momentary person-to-person contact, without the use of materials or mechanical devices, accomplished with limited force, to (1) prevent a student from completing an act that could result in potential harm to him/herself or others, or damage to property, or (2) remove a disruptive student who is unwilling to leave the area.

Use of Isolated Time Out and Physical Restraint
Isolated time out and physical restraint shall only be used as a means of maintaining a safe and orderly environment for learning, and only to the extent that they are necessary to preserve the safety of students and others. Isolated time out and physical restraint shall not be used as a form of punishment.

In addition, physical restraint shall not be used unless the student:

(1) poses a physical risk to him/herself or others,
(2) there is no medical contraindication to its use, and
(3) the staff assigned to special programs applying the restraint has been trained in its safe application pursuant to State of Illinois regulations.

A verbal threat is not considered a physical risk unless the student also demonstrates a means of or intent to carry out the threat. Mechanical or chemical restraints will not be used under any circumstances, and medically prescribed restraint procedures will not be used for purposes of maintaining discipline.

Written Procedures
Written procedures governing the use of isolated time out and physical restraint have been developed by the Superintendent or his/her designee. School staff must follow these written procedures whenever isolated time out or physical restraint is used. Parents may obtain a copy of such procedures by contacting the office of the Executive Director for Educational Services.

Maintenance of Documentation
Whenever isolated time out or physical restraint is used, the student’s case manager shall be notified as soon as possible, and shall document the incident as set forth in the procedures governing isolated time out and physical restraint.

Evaluation of Incidents Resulting in Injury
Any incident that results in a serious injury to the student (as determined by the student, responsible parent or guardian, staff or other individual) shall be reported to the Superintendent or his/her designee. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall investigate and evaluate the incident.

Alternative Behavioral Strategies
Positive, non-aversive behavioral interventions designed to develop and strengthen desirable student behaviors should be used when they are likely to be effective. Such non-restrictive interventions are identified in the School District 59 Recommended Behavioral Intervention Procedures for Students with Disabilities. More restrictive behavior interventions, such as isolated time out or physical restraint, shall be used sparingly and approached with caution.

Annual Review of Isolated Time Out and Physical Restraint
At least annually, the Superintendent or his/her designee shall review the use of isolated time out and physical restraint, including.

(1) the number of incidents involving isolated time out and/or physical restraint;
(2) the location and duration of each incident;
(3) the staff members involved;
(4) any injuries or property damage that occurred; and
(5) the timeliness of parental notification and administrative review.


Search and Seizure

For the safety and supervision of students in the absence of parent(s)/guardian(s), to maintain discipline and order in schools, and to provide for the health, safety, and welfare of students and staff, school authorities are authorized to conduct searches of students and their personal effects, as well as District property.

School authorities may inspect and search school property and equipment owned or controlled by the school (such as lockers, desks, and parking lots), as well as personal effects left there by a student, without notice to or the consent of the student. Students have no reasonable expectation of privacy in these places or areas or in their personal effects left there.

The Superintendent may request the assistance of law enforcement officials to conduct inspections and searches of lockers, desks, parking lots, and other school property and equipment for illegal drugs, weapons, or other illegal or dangerous substances or materials, including searches conducted through the use of specially trained dogs.

Students

School authorities may search a student and/or the student’s personal effects (e.g., purses, wallets, knapsacks, book bags, lunch boxes, etc.) when there is a reasonable ground for suspecting that the search will produce evidence the particular student has violated or is violating either the law or the District’s student conduct rules. The search itself must be conducted in a manner that is reasonably related to its objectives and not excessively intrusive in light of the age and sex of the student and the nature of the infraction.

When feasible, the search should be conducted as follows:

•   Outside the view of others, including students;
•   In the presence of a school administrator or adult witness;
•   By a certificated employee or administrator of the same sex as the student.

Seizure of Property
If a search produces evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the District’s policies or rules, such evidence may be seized and impounded by school authorities, and disciplinary action may be taken. When appropriate, such evidence may be transferred to law enforcement authorities.


Notification Regarding Student Accounts or Profiles on Social Networking Websites

The Superintendent or designee shall notify students and their parents/guardians of each of the following in accordance with the Right to Privacy in the School Setting Act, 105 ILCS 75/:

  1. School officials may not request or require a student or his or her parent/guardian to provide a password or other related account information to gain access to the student’s account or profile on a social networking website.
  2. School officials may conduct an investigation or require a student to cooperate in an investigation if there is specific information about activity on the student’s account on a social networking website that violates a school disciplinary rule or policy. In the course of an investigation, the student may be required to share the content that is reported in order to allow school officials to make a factual determination.

 (need es)

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